3 Fun Games to Play at Your Next Tea Party

Tea party games are always fun to plan. If you are looking for the best tea party games, you have come to the right place.

The first game is called Teacup Swap. Any number of people can play Teacup Swap and everyone is a winner! To play, each person needs a teacup and saucer. Let guests know in your invitation that they need to bring a teacup and saucer or you can provide one for each person if your party budget allows it.

When your guests arrive, have them place their teacups at their place setting or have them already arranged there if you are providing them.

Invite all of your guests to admire each teacup and saucer set by walking around the table. When everyone has finished looking, ask the first guest to arrive to be the first to choose a teacup. Continue in the order that the guests arrived in, go alphabetically, or have numbers drawn from a hat. Wherever the cup is, that is where they sit. This is a great game to use when people only sit by others that they know. Each guest will get a chance to pick their favorite, and no matter which teacup others choose, they will each end up with a lovely teacup and saucer to take home!

The second game you are about to learn is called Tea Tasting. This is a great game to play with smaller groups. Make sure that you have several teapots handy, and a little trinket to give away for a prize. Find a few different teas and prepare each in a separate teapot.

Let your guests taste a small bit of each tea, one at a time, without letting them know which is which. After everyone has tasted each flavor and guessed what they might be, award a prize to the best guesser. Don’t forget to write down what tea is in which pot so you don’t get confused! When buying your teas, make sure you purchase contrasting flavors. Familiar flavors are good if your guests are not usually tea drinkers (It will make the game easier for them).

In general, avoid buying mixed teas because the flavors can get confusing.

Try out these great teas for distinct flavors:

Peppermint
Rose Hip
Orange Zest
Green Tea
Lavender
Chai
Chamomile
Ginger
Raspberry

If you are looking for a silly game that is tons of fun, arrange for each guest to make a lovely tea party hat. Look at a craft store or a dollar store for inexpensive hat making materials. Don’t worry too much about finding the perfect craft supplies. Your guests are sure to get creative with whatever you supply. Need some ideas of what to buy? Here are a few ideas:

Silk flowers
Ribbons
Lace
Buttons
Beads
Thread
Bells
Fabric

The fabric can be tulle, which is inexpensive and can easily be cut into 1’x1′ pieces. Hot glue guns are needed for this project, so make sure you have some handy. Make sure you have one for every two people. If you do not have any hot glue guns handy, a few bottles of quick drying craft glue will suffice.

After your guests have finished decorating their hats, award prizes to the biggest hat, the silliest hat, the prettiest hat, etc. This game is lots of fun when everyone wins!

Fun Games to Play With Children, 10 Spontaneous Games to Enrich Their Lives

1. NATURE BRACELETS

For Ages: 1-5

You can start your little one’s exploration and appreciation of nature with this game of making a masking tape nature bracelet. They’ll notice all the lovely color and shape variations there are in petals and leaves and adorn their wrists with beauty.

MATERIALS:

Masking tape

Leaves and flower petals

DIRECTIONS:

Wrap a piece of masking tape around your child’s wrist, sticky side up, and then go exploring to find wonderful leaves, beautiful flower petals and other interesting things to attach to the bracelet.

Before bedtime, snip the bracelet off and attach it next to his bed or somewhere in view so he can admire his work and remember his fun time.

2. RING OF STRING

For Ages:3-10 years

In this game, children are encouraged to really look closely at one spot and see all there is to see. There is a lot of pleasure to be had from noticing the tiny wonders of nature that are in our own back yard.

MATERIALS:

String

Magnifying glass or jar with water in it (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

Make a small circle on the ground with the string. Look carefully at the enclosed area with your child and notice what is growing there. Pull out a weed or blade of grass and see what the roots looks like. Is there a seedpod in the area? What’s inside?

Poke a hole and see if there are any insects around. What are they? What are they doing? Use a magnifying glass or a jar with water in it and look at different things up close.

Gather small things to examine and collect such as pinecones, acorns, petals, seeds, bark, leaves and pretty pebbles.

3. A SPOTLIGHT IN THE DARK

For Ages 1-5 years

Babies are fascinated with anything new. It’s fun for us to be with a little one when she discovers something for the first time. In this game it’s the delight of a flashlight in the dark

MATERIALS:

One or two flashlights

DIRECTIONS:

Keep the lights off in the room that you are in and scan the room with a flashlight, spotlighting different familiar things. “Look there’s the television. Here is the table and there is your high chair.”

You know your little one is going to want a chance to hold the flashlight. Let her. She can shine it wherever she wants or she has to find, with her flashlight, an object you name.

As she gets older and more coordinated, continue this game, but this time you both have flashlights and you encourage her to “catch” your spotlight. You move your spotlight around the room and she has to move hers so it “catches” yours by covering your spotlight with hers.

Your turn to chase next.

4. THE KNOCKING GAME

For: All Ages

Listening to and identifying the different sounds objects make when you knock on them is a game that can be played at any time. When you want to change the focus of fussing children, try saying: “Hey, let’s play a game. Close your eyes and see if you can tell what I’m knocking on. No peeking”

MATERIALS:

Common objects found around the house

DIRECTIONS:

Ask your player to close her eyes and turn her back to you. Then see if she can guess the object you are knocking on with your fist (or a spoon). Start with easy things such as a table and a window, and work towards sounds that are harder to identify, such as knocking on a book or lamp.

Take turns being the identifier and the “knocker”.

5. TOOTHPICK ART

For: All Ages

There are many ways to teach the hands to have more finesse. This is one of them that you can play together.

MATERIALS:

Toothpicks, plain or colored

DIRECTIONS:

Make an abstract design by laying toothpicks out on a table or floor, with each player adding their toothpick to the design. The first player puts down one toothpick. The next player adds his at just the angle that seems pleasing to him. The next person then adds theirs to that design and so on and so on until an interesting design is formed.

Instead of an abstract design, you can make a specific scene. For example, make a house with a picket fence and trees.

!It takes concentration to pick up a skinny toothpick and decide the best place to put it. Placing each toothpick down carefully and trying not to jiggle the design encourages awareness of hand movements.

It also develops the pincer grasp, the small muscles that control the index finger and thumb.

But mainly, it’s fun to make art together.

6. TOE STEPPING

For: All Ages

Here’s a fun and silly game that requires concentration and quick movement. Try it sometime at a birthday party gathering, when you want to redirect excess energy, or when the kids are bored and want something quick and new to do.

MATERIALS:

None but fancy footwork

DIRECTIONS:

Two people, both barefoot or in stocking feet, face each other and hold hands. Each person tries to step on the others toes while at the same time keep their toes from being stepped on.

You might remind the players to step lightly on each other’s toes so that others will do the same to you. In other words, follow this game’s Golden Rule: Step on others as you would want to be stepped on.

Concentrating on both keeping out of the way and going for the goal is a kind of trial by fire. Pressure on their foot lets them know when they weren’t paying close enough attention!

7. BALLOON BASEBALL

For Ages: 1-5

Baseball may be fun but those balls can hurt and are hard to hit. For young ones, use a balloon!

MATERIALS:

Balloon

Bat: Make a bat out of anything handy, such as the inside cardboard tube of a paper towel roll or a rolled up section of yesterdays newspaper secured with tape

DIRECTIONS:

. Give the bat to your player and toss the balloon to her. The slow movements of a balloon floating towards her gives her plenty of time to line up her bat, swing at the ‘ball” and get the satisfaction of “connecting.”

If there is just the two of you, take turns being the pitcher/catcher and the batter.

If there are other players, their job is catching the “ball” as it leisurely floats down. Who ever catches it can have the next turn at batting or give it to someone who hasn’t had enough turns.

After everyone gets all the turns they want, you can change the game to “Golf”. Use boxes turned on their sides as “holes” and players see how many strokes it takes to hit the balloon in the box.

8. BACK WRITING

For Ages: 5-12 years

Writing invisible letters on a child’s back a fun way to write a secret message.

MATERIALS:

Paper

Pencil

DIRECTIONS:

One person sits with his back to another and a pad of paper and pencil in front of him.

The other person, using his finger, “draws” a letter on the person’s back.

At the same time, that person draws on the paper what he thinks is being drawn on his back.

Keep writing letter by letter until a whole message is given. The message could be a clue to where a treat is hidden!

Take turns so both the writer and the person written on get to experience what it feels like.

Have an older child play this game with a younger sibling as a fun way to help him learn his letters.

9. SELF PORTRAITS

For Ages: Teens

Many teenagers go through a phase where they become fascinated with their reflection in the mirror, especially during the period when their faces make that change from a child’s to a young adult’s.

In this activity, you and your changing child can take advantage of this fascination by drawing your mirror reflection

MATERIALS:

Mirror

Felt tip marker

Paper (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

Both of you sit facing a mirror and draw your reflection directly on the mirror using a felt-tip marker.

You can also draw each other’s on paper but don’t look at the paper until the drawing is done. This often gives a kind of Picasso look to the work

10. SHOE MOUNTAIN

For: All Ages

When the kids are bored but antsy with energy, here is a quickie that is guaranteed to win the hearts of all ages. Your twelve year old will l be just as excited to play this game as your two year old.

MATERIALS:

Shoes

DIRECTIONS

Pile all the shoes you can readily find in a pile in a large cleared out space in the room. Tell the kids that this is not a pile of shoes (silly them to think that!) but is actually a huge mountain and they have to start from a distance away and run towards the mountain and then with one gigantic leap, make it over the top of the mountain to the other side.

It adds to the thrill if the others provide a drum roll–slapping their hands on the floor or on a table or on their knees as the next Leaper makes her run and then when that person is in the air, call out her name!

Fun Games To Play To Improve Memory Can Take on Many Forms

People can learn much easier when they are having fun. In fact, the majority of the animal kingdom teach their young the skills needed to survive through games. So when you want to learn something, getting some fun in would be a tremendous help. Enhancing your memory can also be said to be a learning experience, so looking for games to play to improve memory can be an efficient way to boost brainpower. Because they can be created from anything, games that improve memory can take on many forms, from simple to incredibly creative.

Video and Computer Games

Computer games, especially the more complex ones, can actually help a person’s visual and spatial awareness. They can also be great settings for games to play to improve memory. For instance, a number of video games like first person shooter games or world-building games require you to keep track of the map and the places you have been, as well as your companions if you are in a multi-player game. The more complex PC or console games require that you memorize a set of keys to make the character act in particular ways, and many of the missions or quests require brains to solve and complete. Who would have thought that these games would actually help your brain improve? It’s definitely not an excuse to cut school though.

Card Games and More

There are many games to play to improve memory that are not video games or digital. Card games are one of the simplest. The pair matching card game, for instance is something you can accomplish with a normal card deck. There are also more than a few toys that can help you improve memory. The classic electronic game called Simon is an example. Simply by visiting the nearest toy store, you can choose from quite a selection. The best thing is that you can invite friends over to play these games with you if you don’t want to play along. They can also be great games to bond over with family.

Fun, Fun, and More Fun

Looking for games to play to improve memory is not that hard, but you can also create your own games easily and with themes of your choice. The more you play and have fun, the more you will realize that you are remembering more than before. The thought of improving memory while doing the things you do for fun is quite a deviation from normal schooling to learn things, isn’t it? To learn, try not to think of what you are doing as learning, but as entertainment and a chance to do something enjoyable. In less time than you might think, you will stop worrying about forgetting the names of your new acquaintances or the places where you put your car keys.